Delicious traditional Muboora (Pumpkin leaves)

3 Servings ~ 15 minutes
  • 1 bunch muboora (pumpkin leaves)
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 tbsp pure vegetable oil
  • 500 ml boiling water
  • 2 tomatoes (chopped)
  • 1/2 onion (chopped)

Muboora (pumpkin leaves) has got to be my all time favourite leafy green vegetable. I love love love it! I enjoy this version with tomatoes and onions as well as the dovi version (when it’s in peanut butter sauce), and in fresh cream or white sauce, totally delish! It’s however important to give muboora a thorough wash before cooking it as it usually has quite a bit of mud/ soil on it’s leaves. Eating it after it wasn’t washed properly will probably make you despise it! So again I emphasize, give it a real good wash. 😉

Quick Instructions

  1. With your muboora (pumpkin leaves) (1 bunch), tomatoes (2 tomatoes, chopped) and onions (1/2 onion, chopped) ready, begin washing your muboora (pumpkin leaves). Give them a thorough wash until you’re satisfied that it’s clean 😀 (I did this 4 times just to be sure! 😀 ) Break of part of the stem and pull of the silk from the pumpkin leaves. Do this one leaf at a time. In Shona we call this kufurura.
  2. After kufurura, cut your pumpkin leaves up. Put some water (500 ml boiling water) in a pot and add bicarbonate of soda (1 tsp). Close the pot and bring the water to a boil.
  3. Add your cut up pumpkin leaves to the boiling water and close the pot. Bring to the boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally in between. After  5 minutes drain your pumpkin leaves in a colander.
  4. Give your pot a quick rinse (do not rinse the pumpkin leaves) then return the pumpkin leaves to the pot. Add cooking oil (4 tbsp), salt (1 tsp), onions and tomatoes. Stir, reduce heat, close pot  and let simmer until tomatoes and onions are cooked through (about 10 minutes).
  5. Your pumpkin leaves are done. Serve with sadza (pap) and your favourite relish or just as is. Enjoy!

 

Pictorial Detailed Instructions

Step 1
With your muboora (pumpkin leaves) (a), tomatoes and onions ready (b), begin washing your muboora (pumpkin leaves) (c). Give them a thorough wash until you’re satisfied that it’s clean 😀 (I did this 4 times just to be sure! 😀 ) Break of part of the stem and pull of the silk from the pumpkin leaves (d). Do this one leaf at a time. In Shona we call this kufurura.

 

Step 2
After kufurura (a), cut your pumpkin leaves up (b). Put some water in a pot and add bicarbonate of soda (c). Close the pot and bring the water to a boil (d).

 

Step 3
Add your cut up pumpkin leaves to the boiling water (a) and close the pot (b). Bring to the boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally in between (c). After 5 minutes drain your pumpkin leaves in a colander (d).

 

Step 4
Give your pot a quick rinse then return the pumpkin leaves to the pot (a). Add cooking oil, salt, onions and tomatoes (b). Stir (c), reduce heat then close pot and let simmer until tomatoes and onions are cooked through (about 10 minutes) (d).

 

Step 5
Your pumpkin leaves are done. Serve with sadza (pap) and your favourite relish or just as is. Enjoy!
Delicious Muboora

 

 You just gotta love muboora! The nutrition that comes with this dish is a welcome added bonus. It’s rich in iron and folic acid which are important for many things in our bodies including formation of red blood cells which transport oxygen to the rest of the body.

 

19 Comments

  1. hello rumbie so good to see all our tradional recipes which we forgotten about as we did not pay attention to our parents and grandparents.keep up the good work

     
  2. chikafu chakanaka kuratidza kuti ndizvo zvatakakura tichidya isu vashona

     
  3. Where can you get pumpkin leaves in The U.S

     
  4. I have planted a pumpkin variety called Golden Nugget which was just about overtaking the garden space so finding your recipe and cooking it this afternoon has proven a winner , i added a little extra garlic cloves and a cup of blended peanut Thanks
    Best Regards
    Peter in Sydney Oz

     
  5. TX FOR THE RECIPE JUST COOKED MY MUBOORA NOW

     
  6. Thank you so much for this recipe I didn’t even know pumpkin leaves could be eaten until a Korean friend told me that she uses them like the Greeks use vine leaves – waste not want not : )

    I have plenty of pumpkin leaves but sadly my pumpkins are non-existant – keep dropping off : (

    Thanks again. Angela (Adelaide Australia)

     
    • Hi Angela, the pleasure is all mine! I hope you’ll enjoy them as much as I do! Sorry about your pumpkins, hope you’ll eventually get some 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

       
    • You need to manually pollinate them, if you don’t they abort (drop off). Google has all the info you need!

       
  7. Thanks for the recipe., I didn’t know how to cook muboora until I visited my inlaws in Zvishavane. Now it’s one of the vegetables i cook most of the times.

     
  8. Nice. Thank you for this.

     
  9. Cathrine from KENYA

    Hello Rumbie. Am passionate about eating healthy. I love reading about fruits and vegetables of different types and cultures. I discovered something knew a must to cook with your recipe.
    Pumpkin flowers too was a surprise to me. In my country KENYA we eat PUMPKIN. We also eat pumpkin leaves. 1st some communities here eat pumpkin leaves with UGALI (A meal made from maize flour). There other communities that eat it in a dish called MUKIMO. Recipe 4 MUKIMO ingredients: potatoes, bananas(optional), boiled (any type beans or peas others use tender maize ), onions and pumpkin leaves. Method: in a large deep pan put everything add a cup of water and salt then let it cook till tender. when ready take a wooden stick and mash everything together. Serve with chicken broth or beef broth and salad.